Thursday, 12 May 2016

Q & A with Tash McAdam

Blood in the Water (Warp Weavers 0.5)
by Tash McAdam

There have always been warps—tears between realities—and they’ve always been a threat to humanity. Most people are blind to them. But Hallie’s eyes are opening. Now that she’s going to school at the Protectorate, she’s learning there’s more to life than fun and games.

The truth is, she’s just become part of Earth’s only shield against the monsters of the warps. Before, she didn’t think she was anything special. Now, yanked from her relatively normal life, she realizes that she doesn’t have a choice.

When the emergency alarm sounds, calling everyone in the school to arms, even the young and inexperienced are needed. As one of the warp weavers—capable of closing the warps and stopping the monsters—Hallie must now work to save lives. And she must do it in the most complicated situation she’s ever experienced. Because there are sea serpents in the Thames, and Hallie has to close the doors that are letting them in.

The problem is, they’re underwater, and they’re hungry.

Now everyone is relying on her, and Hallie must find a way to do her job—with a brand new partner—before it’s too late. Because if she fails she’ll die, along with everyone who’s depending on her.

Don't miss this prequel to Tash McAdam's new series, Warp Weavers, coming in 2016. 

ebook, 40 pages
Published July 14th 2015 by Glass House Press (first published July 7th 2015)

Find it on Goodreads
Read It & Reap:  April 2016

SLAM (The Psionics 0.5)
by Tash McAdam 

Telepaths, torture, mindwipes ... the Institute has it all, and they use each of their brainwashed children as weapons, the way they see fit. To control society, repress its people. To make certain that they stay in power, no matter the cost. Serena’s baby brother Damon is one of those children, and these days he’s so altered that he doesn’t even recognize her. 

When it comes to getting Damon away from those who kidnapped him, there's nothing Serena won't do. Even if she has to kill him to save him. First, though, she must prove to her father that she has what it takes to be a soldier against the insidious threat of the Institute. Her first mission has to be perfect.

But with inaccurate intelligence, unexpected storms, and Gav Belias, people’s hero of the Watch, on the prowl, will she even survive? If she doesn't succeed, they'll never let her go after her brother.

And that would be unthinkable, when it was her fault that he was taken in the first place.

Slam is Tash McAdam’s first work with Glass House Press, and serves as a prequel to the series The Psionics. The first novel, Maelstrom, is scheduled for release in February 2016. 

ebook, 89 pages

Published October 14th 2014 by Glass House Press (first published September 16th 2014)

Find it on Goodreads 
Read It & Reap:  April 2016


Tash McAdam’s first writing experience (a collaborative effort) came at the age of eight, and included passing floppy discs back and forth with a best friend at swimming lessons. Since then, Tash has spent time falling in streams, out of trees, learning to juggle, dreaming about zombies, dancing, painting, learning Karate, becoming a punk rock pianist, and of course, writing.

Tash is a teacher in real life, but dreams of being a full-time writer, and living a life of never-ending travel. Though born in the hilly sheepland of Wales, Tash has lived in South Korea and Chile and now calls Vancouver, Canada home.

SLAM, a novella in The Psionics, is Tash’s first published work. Maelstrom, the full length novel will be out in June. Visit the website or facebook for news, gossip, and random tidbits about Tash’s adventures.


Q & A with Tash McAdam

1. Tell us a little bit about your main characters. 
Oh I have so many! I'll talk about my most imminent series. My main characters in the Psionics series are Epsilon 17 and Toby Reynolds. They are from very different backgrounds. Epsilon 17 is a telepathic Reader who was enslaved by a government organisation developed to keep telepaths under control. She was raised by this organisation, robbed of her memories repeatedly, but as the story unfolds she becomes able to hold on to parts of herself through the memory-wiping procedure. Traumatized and terrified, she starts making plans to escape. Toby, on the other hand, is a privileged boy raised in the inner city with the best of everything at his disposal... until a freak accident reveals his own telepathic powers and he's forced to go on the run from the very people who are supposed to protect him.

2. Who designs the covers for your books and what is that process like for you as an author?
I actually run a cover design company with my partner, and I did the covers for Blood in the Water and Panic (both short stories) myself. The rest of my covers have come from a few different sources, and the process has always involved a lot of chatting with my publisher, mutual idea generation, before handing it off to the designer. It's a strange process, because what you envision for your book may not be the best way to draw readers in, what you have in your minds eye might be accurate but not easily understood at a glance. So, you have to trust that the designer knows what they are doing, and let that personal attachment soften a little.  Covers are vital to your sales, they are the first thing people see, the first impression. You have to interest but not overwhelm. And just because your particular tastes lean a certain way doesn't mean that's what's best for your book.

3. Describe your ideal writing spot.
My idea writing spot is at my handmade copper and pine desk, looking out over my gorgeous view of the mountains, with a hot cup of coffee on my right and some delicious snacks close to hand. And silence. Utter silence.

4. What is the best advice you have been given?
You can't please everybody, so do something you are proud of, learn from criticism if it is constructive, and let it go with the adage 'maybe they just aren't your audience' if it's not. Oh, or 'can't fix what doesn't exist', which is what I tell myself every time I'm struggling to get the words on paper.

5. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I changed my mind pretty often, but most memorably, a blacksmith.

6. Which do you prefer: hard/paperbacks or ebooks?
Can I have both? I like to collect hardcovers on my shelf for admiring and flicking through, and ebooks for the convenience.

7. If you could have any supernatural power, what would you choose and why?
I would love to be able to teleport. I'm a Brit living in Canada, and my whole family is still in the UK along with a bundle of awesome friends. I've also been lucky enough to have traveled extensively and I have people all around the world I'd love to be able to casually drop in on.

8. What book are you reading now?
I just started Morning Star, the third book in the Red Rising trilogy by Pierce Brown. I am really excited, it's one of my favorite series ever! But I'm only on page four so I can't say anything about it apart from that my hopes are high.



Wednesday, 11 May 2016

Q & A with Kit Campbell

City of Hope and Ruin
by Kit Campbell

Every night the monsters hunt.

A city that is the whole world: Theosophy and her companions in the City militia do their best to protect the civilians from the monsters, but they keep crawling from the Rift and there’s nowhere to run. Theosophy knows she’ll die fighting. It’s the best kind of death she’s seen, and at least she can save lives in the meantime.

They say the Scarred carve you up while you’re still alive.

A village in the shadow of a forest: Refugees from the border whisper about the oncoming Scarred, but Briony can’t convince her brother to relocate his children to safety. Briony will do anything to protect them. She owes them that much, even if it means turning to forbidden magic.

When Theosophy and Briony accidentally make contact across the boundaries of their worlds, they realize that solutions might finally be within reach. A world beyond the City would give Theosophy’s people an escape, and the City’s warriors could help Briony protect her family from the Scarred. Each woman sees in the other a strength she lacks—and maybe something more.

All they need to do is find a way across the dimensions to each other before their enemies close in. 

ebook, 326 pages
Expected publication: May 11th 2016 by Turtleduck Press

Find it on Goodreads
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Read It & Reap:  November 20, 2016


Kit Campbell has never met a mythology she hasn’t liked. This sometimes leads to issues, such as the occasional Norse God of Thunder showing up in the Garden of Eden. She adores weaving in the possibilities forgotten magic can bring to a story, and enjoys making up new creatures, such as large, venomous monsters that hunt in packs.

Kit’s stories have been published in half-a-dozen anthologies, and her YA novella, Hidden Worlds, was released by Turtleduck Press in 2010.

Kit lives in Colorado in a house of ever-increasing chaos. 

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4487552.Kit_Campbell
Twitter: @KitCampbell
Website: http://kitcampbellbooks.com/


Q & A with Kit Campbell

1. Tell us a little bit about your main characters. 
Theosophy has dedicated her life to the protection of the City. She fully believes that she’ll give her life to protect it, because that’s the best she can do. Briony is a healer determined to protect her family. She sees it as her duty, since she couldn’t protect them when she was younger. Both women feel somewhat trapped in their respective environments.

2. Who designs the covers for your books and what is that process like for you as an author?
I’ve used a variety of cover artists for different books, but for this book we went with Deranged Doctor Design (http://derangeddoctordesign.com). We’ve been very pleased with the entire process, as well as the end product, and I think we’ll use them again in the future. They were especially helpful because my co-writer and I were having a hard time coming up with what we wanted on the cover, and they managed to take what we gave them about the story and make something awesome.

3. Describe your ideal writing spot.
Quiet. I can and have written a number of places that have worked merely because they were quiet enough that I could hear myself think. Ideally, though, I’d have a comfortable chair, a nice mug of tea, some sunlight, and no distractions. It’s that last one that always gets you.

4. What is the best advice you have been given?
It’s no use worrying over things you can’t change.

5. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
An astronaut. I devoured books on the space program, went to Space Camp three times, and even had half of my application to the Air Force Academy in place so I could be a space shuttle commander. But my vision’s never been so great and I’m very tall, so I would never have been accepted into the astronaut corp, at least by the guidelines of the time. They may have changed. I eventually went into aerospace engineering instead, figuring I could at least send things into space.

In retrospect, however, I was probably always destined to be some sort of storyteller. My parents have certainly never been surprised by the way my career has gone.

6. Which do you prefer: hard/paperbacks or ebooks?
In general, I prefer physical books. I like the smell, the feel, the heft. But I also like ebooks. I like that I can take a ton of them with me when I travel instead of porting three paperbacks along. I like that I can set my ereader on the exercise bike and not have to worry about losing my place. And being able to read ebooks on my phone means that I’m almost never without a story when I have a few minutes to myself.

7. If you could have any supernatural power, what would you choose and why? The ability to know what someone was up to at any point in time. As a parent, that would be so very helpful. My kids would literally never get away with anything. I mean, like most superpowers, there’s a downside to it as well. I imagine there’s a lot of chaos to be wrought with a power like that. Also, what if you couldn’t control it and every time you thought about someone, you also saw what they were doing? Sometimes you probably don’t want to know.

8. What book are you reading now?
I’m reading The Spirit Ring by Lois McMaster Bujold. I’ve got a Twitter specfic book club, and that’s our pick for the month. It’s alt history fantasy. I’m maybe a quarter of the way through thus far, and it’s been pretty good.



Friday, 29 April 2016

Q & A with H.D. Gordon

The Halfling (The Aria Fae Series #1)
by H.D. Gordon 

Being seventeen and an outcast is hard. Being seventeen and only half human is harder.

When Aria Fae gets cast out of the Peace Brokers, a secret supernatural organization that’s trained her since infancy, and is left to fend for herself in the human world, she finds herself in Grant City, intent on attempting a normal human life.

As a Halfling, Aria has abilities that are a little underused in the flower shop she lands a job at. And when her new friend Samantha Shy enlists Aria to help investigate her mother’s death, the two girls decide to become vigilantes.

A new drug called Black Magic is running rampant in the streets of Grant City, turning people into supercharged maniacs. With Sam’s mad computer skills, and Aria’s Faevian abilities, they may be just the heroes Grant City is in need of.

Or they may find out they’re in way over their heads, and their mutual crush on the same guy is the least of their worries. 

Paperback, 1st Edition, 319 pages
Published March 3rd 2016 by Black Quill Publishing

Find it on Goodreads
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Read It & Reap:  October 25, 2016



H. D. Gordon is the author of young adult and adult fiction. She has independently sold over 40,000 e-copies of her books worldwide, and has an eclectic taste in genres.

H. D. is a poet, a mother, a philosopher and an earth-lover. She believes our actions have ripple effects, and in the sacred mission of bringing love and light to the world.

She loves big dreamers, animals, children, killing zombies, eating dessert and old souls. 

She is 26 years old and resides in southern New Jersey—which she insists is really quite lovely.


Q & A with H.D. Gordon

1. Tell us a little bit about your main characters. 
Aria Fae is the main character. She's the hero and the narrator. She's a seventeen-year-old girl who's half-human/half-fae, but who was raised in the human world by an organization run in a military-type fashion. 

In some ways, Aria is very much a normal teen—she likes video games and wears skate shoes and has a current-day humor about her. 

In other ways, however, she's an outcast—different from everyone around her. As a Halfling, she's got certain abilities that make a "normal" life impossible. We meet Aria just as she's been cast out of the organization that had provided her entire way of life. 

She's now alone in the human world. 

At the new high school Aria is attending, she meets Samantha Shy, a sophomore with mad computer skills, and the two turn into a sort of vigilante team, taking on the issues in Grant City.

While there is certainly some romantic interest in book one, the story really focuses on Aria's and Sam's budding friendship, and they get themselves into some serious trouble.

2. Who designs the covers for your books and what is that process like for you as an author?
My covers are done by Deranged Doctor Designs, and I can't say enough great things about their company. The process is a breeze with them, by far the best experience I've had concerning cover art (they do the awesome promo art for me too) in all my thirteen books. They're a team of professionals and artists who know their stuff, are accommodating, and more than reasonably priced. Here's the link if you're interested: http://www.derangeddoctordesign.com

3. Describe your ideal writing spot.
My ideal writing spot has little to do with location or scenery or anything like that, and very much to do with the state of mind I've trained myself to fall into. I'm a single mother of two (which I seriously LOVE so much) and so I can write with my girls running and jumping and screaming around me, with the television on, or in complete silence. It's about narrowing my focus, about being able to divert attention and come right back to the page. And morning time is best for me, after a good night's sleep.

4. What is the best advice you have been given?
The best advice I've been given has been to myself. That may sound silly, but let me explain. Writing is a solitary profession at its core, and there will be times when you get so low you'd swear hell was above you, and no one can pull you out of that but you. In the words of RA Salvator, If you can quit, then quit. If you can't, then you're a writer. 

That, and always strive toward constant improvement and growth, in all aspects of your product. I'm always trying to get better formatting, cleaner writing, better advertisements, images, and covers. Especially as an indie, and the primary creator of my books.

5. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I didn't know. I always wrote. Like, always. But I never really thought about doing it for money. As a child, I was oversensitive, prone to anxiety and depression, and writing was what I did when the world made no sense, or was threatening to break me. Now that I'm older, and better at life in general, I write for myself and others. I feel as though writing was always where I was meant to end up. Like the inevitable return home.

6. Which do you prefer: hard/paperbacks or ebooks?
I feel like the default answer to this is paperbacks, but in honesty, the advent of e-books has changed my whole life. I probably wouldn't be published without them, and no one will have ever read my work but my mom. Also, I'm a big fan of trees, and even though I love a beautiful paperback as much as the next nerdgirl, I like that e-books don't require any tree-chopping. So, boom! I'm a rebel! Give me the e-books!

7. If you could have any supernatural power, what would you choose and why?
I think I would choose super speed. One, because The Flash and I are totally in love (or it could just be me) and two, because it would offer the ability to manipulate time, which is both terrifying and irresistible.

8. What book are you reading now?
I just started Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children, since the movie is coming and I like to read books before the movies come out, and I like it very much so far! Excited to keep going.




Tuesday, 19 April 2016

Q & A with Sophia Whittemore

The Funnyman
by Sophia Whittemore

It isn't a laughing matter when Diana starts to see things in the mist which other people don’t: monsters, gods, and deadly shadows. Yet now she sees another thing, the world of the Impetus, a reality where humans are enslaved and the once-beautiful gods are actually tyrants. Diana must find a way to escape before the exiled king Fear, a vengeful murderer, hunts Diana down It isn't a laughing matter when Diana starts to see things in the mist which other people don’t: monsters, gods, and deadly shadows. Yet now she sees another thing, the world of the Impetus, a reality where humans are enslaved and the once-beautiful gods are actually tyrants. Diana must find a way to escape before the exiled king Fear, a vengeful murderer, hunts Diana down to get back something she's stolen from him. But will her growing feelings for the Prince Isak, the oddly sullen god of comedy, draw her into an all-out war?

Kindle Edition, 167 pages
Published March 2nd 2016 by Clean Reads
 

Read It & Reap:  October 18

 
Sophia Whittemore is a multiracial author with an Indonesian mother and a Minnesotan father. She penned THE FUNNYMAN during her sophomore year of high school at Benet Academy and published it as a senior. Her love for the English language manifested itself in eighth grade when she went to the Scripps National Spelling Bee and has continued with other languages such as Spanish and Indonesian. Her prior publications include "A Clock's Work" in a Handersen Publishing magazine, "Blind Man's Bluff" in Parallel Ink, and winning awards in the Best Midwestern Writing competition for high school writers. She currently resides in Chicago, Illinois with her family and food- loving mini schnauzer called Tiger. Drawing on inspiration from her two cultural backgrounds, Sophia lives a life playing tennis, traveling, and writing about her dual life experiences through other characters in her works or on her blog.

Website:
http://sophiawhittemore.com/
Amazon:
https://t.co/BN6JwGu5eN
Twitter: https://twitter.com/sophiawhitte
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Authorsophia...
Instagram: @authorsophiawhittemore
Google + : Sophia Whittemore, Author
Tumblr:
http://authorsophiawhitte.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: @AuthorSophiaW
GoodReads: Sophia Whittemore

 
Q & A with Sophia Whittemore 

1. Tell us a little bit about your main characters.
Well, I have two main characters. You have the teenage Diana Cato of half-Indian descent who has an artistic soul while still being strong-willed. She walks the line between gods and men, curious about the secrets hidden within her past. Then there's Prince Isaakios, the boy king who seemingly doesn't want to inherit the throne, choosing to flirt his way across the Earth with human women instead. But there's also a deep pain hidden within him, some dark past that Diana senses within him. She wants to heal him, and he wants his freedom. But freedom from what or who?

2. Who designs the covers for your books and what is that process like for you as an author?
My cover artist for "The Funnyman" was Amanda L. Matthews, who my publisher Stephanie Taylor found through Clean Reads. The process was smooth and transitioned well from my mind to the picture. I emailed them details about the picture I had in my head about my characters and the theme and mystique I wanted surrounding it, and everything was put together perfectly. It's startling to see how the images and descriptions inside your head translate in the real world, but it's well worth it.

3. Describe your ideal writing spot.
My ideal writing spot is next to an open window, with sun filtering down onto my laptop and journals. My books surround me, a smell of light perfume in the air. Summer croaks gently outside, the wind wafting inwards along with the light of an benevolent sun, the warmth of midday.

4. What is the best advice you have been given?
"It's gain theory. You have everything to gain, and nothing to lose. So go for it."

5. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I wanted to work in Hollywood. Only later on did I discover how my love for the silver screen translated into a love for the stories on the silver screen to a love for writing those stories down onto paper. I love stories, any kind, scripts or novels or poetry. They're all wonderful to me. 

6. Which do you prefer: hard/paperbacks or ebooks?
They're different mediums. Hardcovers put less strain on my eyes. However, if I want to "binge read" and check out as many works as possible in a short amount of time, then Ebooks are the way to go. And if you have the right reading device for you, there's no strain on your eyes at all. There's a whole literary world at your fingertips, and there's something very appealing about that. Although, you can't go wrong with tradition, either.

7. If you could have any supernatural power, what would you choose and why?
I would want the ability to travel into the worlds of movies and books and poetry. I'd love to see a fictional or historical world that's hidden inside a book simply because it would be pure magic! I can't say how I'd fare against an Orc or Darth Vader though. Hm...

8. What book are you reading now?
Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton
 
 

Sunday, 17 April 2016

Rogue by Julie Kagawa

Rogue (Talon #2)Rogue by Julie Kagawa
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received this from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

I am a big fan of Julie Kagawa's writing. I loved her Iron Fey series and Blood of Eden series so when she wrote a series about dragons I knew I had to read it. Rogue is the second book in that series and I was lucky enough to receive a copy from NetGalley for review. I would advise reading the first book Talon before this one.

Rogue begins where Talon ended. Ember Hill escaped from Talon, the dragon organization, with the help of Cobalt a rogue dragon and Garret, a St. George solider whose mission is to kill all dragons. Garret went against all of his training to save Ember’s life. Now, it is her turn to save his since he is scheduled for execution due to his betrayal of St. George. Can Ember save Garret before it is too late?

Rogue is an action-packed story with love, loyalty, hatred and betrayal. Who will Ember choose Cobalt who appeals to her dragon side or Garret who stirs emotions she didn’t know she had? Love triangles don’t bother me and to be honest I wasn’t sure who Ember should choose either. I enjoyed learning more about both Talon and St. George also why Cobalt decided to go rogue. This was an enjoyable read and I am looking forward to the next installment.



View all my reviews

Tuesday, 12 April 2016

Q & A with S.B. Roozenboom

Xenophobia
by S.B. Roozenboom

It's been two centuries since the Telumiras arrived and settled on Earth, changing everything —including the genetic makeup of humans.

Living in the section of land occupied by her own species, Ness Kimler tries to be a normal teenager, worrying about her career and finding a mate—questions to be answered at her upcoming graduation.

But before that happens, Ness accidentally crosses the Great Fence separating humans and Telumiras. For 200 years, the barrier has been in place, preserving the peace on a planet divided between two species.

What she finds is that the Fence isn't just about keeping the aliens in—it's about keeping the humans out.

And Ness Kimler just broke the rules.

Paperback, 279 pages
Expected publication: August 16th 2016 by WiDo Publishing

Find it on Goodreads
Buy it on Amazon

Read It & Reap:  October 20, 2016

Born to the great northwest, I grew up submerged in fairytales, monster stories, and legends. At seventeen I wrote my first book, which later became the YA epic fantasy, MARKINGS. My other works include YA paranormal novels PREDATOR GIRL and my self-published novel, A TASTE OF SILVER.







 Q & A with S.B. Roozenboom

1. Tell us about your main characters.
Xenophobia follows the story of Ness Kimler, a teenager living in the New USA, one of few nations left after the war between aliens and humans in 2012. While the wars ended two hundred years ago, she is faced with her own battle of trying to decipher her cryptosyms -- the symbols in her skin that will determine her future -- as well as dull her constant fear of the Great Fence, the border that separates humans from alien life. Everyone tells her she shouldn't fear the Fence as it is well monitored and enforced, but if that was the truth she would never meet Tevire, an alien boy who has trespassed onto her side of the world. 

2. Who designs the covers for your books and what is that process like for you as an author?
WiDo Publishing has designed all of my book covers (with one self-published exception) and they have always done a beautiful job. The first time I saw my book cover for Xenophobia I was sitting behind my desk at work and squealed like a piglet, much to my coworkers' surprise, because I was finally finished. After 3 years of writing and rewriting and fighting to make the book as amazing as possible, Xenophobia was about to become a reality. It is truly a phenomenal moment.  

3. Describe your ideal writing spot.
Well, i don't quite have one yet! I used to type my books on the office computer in our family home where I could really think and plot out the perfect story, but since our family is broken apart now I've chosen to move out into a house of my own. The house is still new to me, but I'm thinking my new writing spot is going to be on my bed with my lap desk :)

4. What is the best advice you have been given?
I think the best advice I have ever received was, "Do it. Do it because you want to. Do it because you can." After my family fell apart, in a way I often felt disabled in life. Not only physically, but mentally. I told myself I couldn't do things because of A, B, C, D, etc... I'm slowly reminding myself I can do all the things I want to do. If I want to get up and go for a walk, I can. If I want to garden even though it's raining, I can. If I want to write a new book, I can. The only person that stops us from making our lives the way we want it, is ourselves. It boils down to us and our choices. If we want to build a better life, we can do it. It's not always easy (actually it can be extremely hard) but nothing is impossible.

5. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I was a funny because I always thought I would grow up and be a clothing designer. I was a writer even as a kid but I had convinced myself I would never be good enough to be published (heh) so I had to have another career option... I actually did grow up to be a designer, except I design and sell jewelry, not clothes.

6. Which do you prefer: hard/paperbacks or ebooks?
My heart will always be in the real thing-- I want to touch my books, smell them, turn them, experience them in a way you never will with ebooks. However, I can say as a rising author it is better to be in the ebook business. You will make more money and you will have a lot more resources.

7. If you could have any supernatural power, what would you choose and why?
Gosh, I don't know how I would pick one! I suppose I would be something elemental, a white witch sort of being with control over the elements maybe? Either that or I'd like to have the ability to talk to animals. Maybe then I could convince my chihuahua to stop peeing on my kitchen floor. Hah, hah.

8. What book are you reading now?
So much has been going on in my life I haven't be able to finish anything I've started. I think the most recent book I finished was Hyperbole and a Half, an illustrated memoir by Allie Brosh. That has to be my new favorite book ever! It was so funny, so poignant, and so revolutionary for the nonfiction market. I highly recommend!



Thursday, 10 March 2016

Q & A with S. Jane Gari

Losing the Dollhouse
by S. Jane Gari 

When nineteen-year-old Jane finally works up the nerve to expose the truth about her stepfather's sexual advances, her mother is outraged. But not at the stepfather. Her mother takes his side-a betrayal that threatens to destroy the family and leaves Jane struggling to forge her own identity as she enters adulthood. Once marriage is on the table, Jane packs up her life and resolves to stare her demons down. Losing the Dollhouse offers a slice of dysfunctional Americana complete with divorce, stepfamilies, eating disorders, mental illness and the search for true love. 

Paperback, 238 pages
Published February 2nd 2014 by Touchpoint Press

Find it on Goodreads
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Read It & Reap:  September 18, 2016



S. Jane Gari lives in Elgin, South Carolina with her husband and daughter. Her nonfiction has been nominated for three Pushcart Prizes. In addition to her upcoming memoir,Losing the Dollhouse, she has also co-written Flush This Book, a collection of humorous essays.





                                    Q & A with S. Jane Gari

1. Tell us a little bit about your main characters.
Losing the Dollhouse is a memoir, so I had to craft real people into characters, including myself. I wrote the first few drafts for myself and then edited with the reader in mind. Readers wouldn’t know anything about the details I take for granted, like the mannerisms and physicality of people I’ve known all my life. The main characters are my mother, stepfather, father, stepmother, sister, husband, and me. The central relationship in the memoir, however, is between my mother and me and how we navigated life after I disclosed my stepfather’s ongoing sexual advances and she took his side. My mother was the kind of mom who played with me, listened to me, read to me every night, and cheered me on. I was a sensitive, artistic kid and young adult. Her betrayal is something I still struggle with.

2. Who designs the covers for your books and what is that process like for you as an author?
Brett J. Miller (http://www.bjm-bookdesign.com) designed the cover for Losing the Dollhouse. I thought the cover should have a dollhouse on it, but he felt we should go for something to solicit a more immediate visceral, emotional response. Once I saw what he had in mind I could see he was right. As much as we don’t like to admit it, books are often judged by their covers—that’s what draws somebody in to pick up the book and give it a chance. 

3. Describe your ideal writing spot.
My ideal writing spot is the table in my kitchen under the skylight on a warm day with the door to my screened-in porch wide open. It’s the best of all worlds—an ergonomic setup with fresh air pouring in. I get to enjoy the feel of being outside without the direct glare from the sun on my computer screen (and without the bugs).

4. What is the best advice you have been given?
“To thine own self be true.” It’s one of my favorite quotes from Hamlet. Ironically, my mother used to say it to me all the time. Ultimately that advice led me to write Losing the Dollhouse.

5. As a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?
I wanted to be a ballerina until ninth grade. Then I set my sights on being an English teacher and a writer. But I still go to the ballet as a spectator.

6. Which do you prefer: hard/paperbacks or eBooks?
I still prefer a hardcopy of a book in my hand, especially if it’s a nonfiction book I’d like to browse through later for references. I taught high school English for years, and I love to look through my copies of novels with copious notes in the margins. My Kindle saves me from stockpiling thousands of books, but I’ll always love my “real” books best.

7. If you could have any supernatural power what would you choose and why?
I’d want the power to heal myself and others. I think it would be the most practical and the most gratifying.

8. What book are you reading now?
I just started The Stone Necklace by fellow South Carolina author Carla Damron.